The revolutionary possibilities for automation ought not distract from their palpable everyday benefits. Robots’ broad chrome shoulders will not disdain the burden of minor everyday CRM management tasks that drain hours from the overtaxed NGO’s weeks and color from its staffers’ hair, and their talent for uncomplaining repetitive tasks can turn the impossible into the indispensable.

LuminateBot is one of Frakture’s most advanced and feature-rich offerings, already serving scores of Blackbaud customers.

When you sign up with Frakture as a Luminate user, sure, we’ll be eager to talk with you about warehousing, dataviz, the whole paradigm shift.

But the bots also have a botload of gadgets to start powering up your Luminate instance right out of the box, the stuff you always wished Luminate had or maybe never dreamt it could ever do. Here are a few of the coolest time-saving, system-buffing automations that LuminateBot can bring to your organization today.

1. Run your ReportWriter reports

ReportWriter is a great tool, but executing reports — especially reports you have to remember to run over and over again — can fall somewhere on the spectrum from an ongoing nuisance to a real time suck, especially when you have to wait on Luminate’s maximum of three queued reports.

Luminate Report Writer report queues

Yawn …

No matter how onerous or time-consuming your reporting needs are, bots know how to log in, kick off reports, wait however long needs waiting, and then ship the output along to its destination — whether that’s a table in your data warehouse, a push to an external system, or an attachment in your inbox. And they’ll do it every single day without supervision or reminders.

2. Batch subscribing/unsubscribing

Get control of your Luminate list! Frature’s bots know how to identify Luminate constituents and turn their email subscription setting on or off according to … well … whatever criteria you care to give them. Here are a few ways we’ve seen it used:

  • Automatically resubscribe previously-unsubscribed constituents who take a particular campaign action in Luminate. (This requires messaging care but it’s a powerful way to pull folks back onto your list.)
  • Automatically synchronize Luminate subscribe status with an outside system, such as your text messaging application.
  • Automatically prune inactive subscribers to maximize the inbox deliverability of engaged supporters on your list.

If you’ve got an actual or desired work process that ends with “unsubscribe” or “resubscribe”, LuminateBot has you covered. (They’re just fine with “add”, “remove”, and “update” too!) As with all Frakture bots, it can also mix and match selection criteria to your taste, using data from within Luminate and data from outside sources.

3. Create and populate Luminate groups

Ever wished you could auto-generate Luminate group segments for field organizing or supporter tracking … without having to build the groups one by one in Luminate?

LuminateBot can create new groups using any naming convention you like, and add Luminate constituents to them using any selection process you like.

Use it as an engine to auto-segment according to your supporters’ evolving engagement profiles, or as a tool to mirror via Luminate groups the supporter segments being generated in a different system, or as a way to shuttle folks into different group-oriented email lists: whatever the need, bots won’t be bored to keep everyone in the proper bucket. They love it!

4. Deduplication and data cleanup

Deduplication in most CRMs can be a tedious affair, and Luminate is no different. Luckily, Frakture’s bots find tedium fascinating!

Frakture will scan your list for suspected duplicates, find matches based on mixed criteria including names, emails, “fuzzy matching” and more, and do the tidying dupe-by-dupe using Luminate’s own merge feature. LuminateBot can chomp 50,000+ duplicates per day, which is 50,000 fewer dubious records that won’t be underfoot clutter, accidentally escalating your billing tier.

Frakture merge dashboard

A Frakture dashboard tracks one recent deduplication project.

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